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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
with jim davis, executive director of the colorado department of public safety. he's also chair of the national governor's association homeland security advisors council. among big events he's worked on was the 2008 democratic national convention in denver. and ed cannon, currently of t&m protection resources, a private security consulting firm. he was formerly an assistant chief of the new york city police department, and helped set up security for that city's marathon and many other events. well, jim davis, starting with you, how does boston change things for people in your position? what kinds of discussions are going on now? >> well, certainly we're much more focused on security. you know, in the united states we've got pretty short memories and i think after 9/11 we were very focused on security and then things kind of we'd go through a time period where we don't a lot of attacks or any successful attacks and now boston happens and people get focused on it again. i think that in the -- in law enforcement and intelligence community we've always been focused on it but people
about you. >> very lovely. >>> someone we also think is lovely, cbs sportscaster jim nantz who we like. he reportedly had an elaborate plan to deal with the blackout at this year's super bowl. most of the superdome went dark in the third quarter. remember that? according to "sports business journal" says nantz he wanted to jump from the broadcast booth, grab a ledge and lower himself into the stands. from there, he wanted to run onto the field and report what was going on. lance barrow who was producing for cbs thought better of the idea and kept nantz in his seat. >> they're probably going thank you, lance barrow. doubt me, don't. jim nantz. >>> live television can be shall we say, a dicey thing, especially when mistakes can last forever on the internet. ben tracy shows us a north dakota tv news anchor who's learning that lesson the hard way. >> reporter: first days on the job can be tough. this one was awful. >> [ bleep ] gay. >> good evening, i'm van tieu. >> a.j. clemente apparently unaware he was on the air swore as he got flustered practicing his lines for hi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
credit but i think it pite have been jim o'neill of goldman saks saying that they don't govern enough. that the politics have to get better. does that ring true to you at all? >> do you know he what he might have said. >> it is true of india but let me add it is true of every country. we can't have better governance. i don't think you should generalize. there are many states in india where there is good 2k3w06 earnance. the central government generally provides good governance but there are weaknesses. we need to identify those weaknesses and rectify them. how can anyone say that we have reached the acme of governance. obviously governance can improve. we need to learn, for example, from the japanese or the chinese how to execute a project on time without a cost overrun. >> rose: right. >> if there is one thing that i would like to learn is how do execute a large project without a cost overrun or a time overrun. >> rose: so why do you have cost overruns or time overruns? >> because of, we, we tolerate inefficiencies. we don't punish people enough. we don't hold people accountable. it
it and start over, not expand it bret? >> bret: all right, jim. thank you. the treasury department says the internal revenue service the irs overpaid up to $13.6 billion in tax credits designed for low income families last year. the report finds the irs in violation of requirements that it set and meet payment reduction targets that it set and meet payment reduction targets. still ahead, emotions come to the surface over boston and immigration reform. first after a week of domestic turmoil, the president turns his focus to international turmoil. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. happening in that department. >> while the president responded to domestic terrorism in boston last week and monitored the search for suspects,
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)